The Justin Addison Memorial Fund

If you have been following the Land Trust for awhile, you know that for many years our signature event was the Justin Addison Memorial Conservation Cup. This event honored the life of Justin Addison, the son of our CEO, Dr. Jay Addison.

The Conservation Cup has been tremendous fun and a wonderful way to make new friends, but it has also been very time and labor intensive for our small staff. When COVID put big events on hiatus, we reassessed how we can continue to honor Justin and give you an opportunity to support Land Trust for Louisiana in his memory.

Justin was an avid outdoorsman and on fire for our mission. We decided to establish the Justin Addison Memorial Fund as a way to carry his passion forward. This holiday season, will you donate to the Land Trust in his memory?

In the new year we look forward to sharing other opportunities to get together, stay connected, and support conservation in Louisiana! With help from supporters like you, we currently exceed a staggering 12,000 acres of farm and forestland in conservation… and we have more projects in the works! Your partnership energizes us and we can’t wait to celebrate these incredible accomplishments with you.

Thank you as always for your commitment to us. We at the Land Trust hope you are well and looking forward to a festive and healing holiday season with family and friends.

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